A Brief History of The Red House

We are super excited to have acquired this beautiful Arts and Crafts style property on Elers Road in Ealing. Built in 1898, it’s a pretty special looking building, so whilst work begins on the renovation, we decided to do a bit of research into it’s history. Thanks to Carole Langley who lives at Number 16 Elers Road who got in touch with some fond memories of the building and also Ealing Local History department for helping us dig through the archives.

The Red House as it is today.

We discovered that originally the building was named after the famous Arts and Crafts home of Sir William Morris in Bexleyheath; The Red House and was one of only two houses on the street at that time. Newly opened Lammas Park provided beautiful, leafy views from the elegant house - unchanged to this day. Although at the time the property would have boasted a larger garden, direct access to the park and a coach house for horses.

The 1901 census tells us the first owner of the property was Andre Aron, a shipping merchant’s clerk. He moved in with his wife Madeline from their native France with two servants. The improved public transport links from the ‘green and leafy’ suburb of Ealing to The City of London where Andre worked would have made it the perfect home for the young couple. Until they moved to New York in 1905.

In 1911 Thomas William Cole bought The Red House and moved in with his wife, two children and five servants. As an Artist and head of Ealing School of Art he presumably appreciated its contemporary Arts & Crafts style. His young family would have enjoyed many a sunny afternoon in Lammas Park with its new bandstand and bowling green. 

Thanks to Ealing Council for this image from WW2. See more in their online archive here

As this map shows, the road has remaining largely unchanged since 1914

In the 1930’s the owners of the house change again and another wealthy family move in. Harry Ross, a surgeon from colonial India, returns to his ancestral country with his wife, daughter Teresa Mary Ross, and several servants. Sadly, his time in the house is brief and in 1938 he passes away aged 69.

10 years pass before the next electoral roll shows Teresa Mary Ross now living as Mrs Mary Mohammed with her husband Ahmed Mohammed at the address having met him on her travels to India. It was quite revolutionary in 1948 for a British woman to marry a Muslim man and probably caused some twitching curtains. But we’re pleased to say the couple spent many happy years in the home, during which time they have two sons who go on to inherit the house.

It looks as though the house was divided into flats during the 60s and for the next 20 years becomes home to multiple families occupying the property on short term contracts and living in what look like bedsits until the 1990s when The Red House is sold again and converted into Lammas Park Nursing Home. 

We are carefully restoring the building, reusing part of the original brickwork.

Empty since 2007, when Uplift acquired the building in 2015 it was in need of a lot of love and attention. So we are carefully restoring it to its former glory and giving The Red House a new lease of life and a range of light, contemporary apartments. 

If all this history has got you intrigued about The Red House, drop our team a line on sales@upliftproperty.co.uk.